THE BATTLE OF GETTYSBURG

 

 

 

By Sister Ray the Astrologer with thanks to Joseph William Clough III

 

As originally published in the April, 2014 issue of Dell Horoscope, The World's Leading Astrology Magazine

 

This article is the property of Dell Magazines and is not to be copied or reproduced without permission.

 

Please visit Dell Horoscope magazine at www.dellhoroscope.com

 

Photographs from The Civil War Trust:  http://www.civilwar.org/search/

 

"...in time men would say of Lee . . . that the stars in their courses had fought against him."

Shelby Foote

 

Introduction

 

 

PART ONE:  ROBERT E. LEE

 

Robert E. Lee:  Man of Destiny

Rectification Exercises

The Venus Front

The Finger of Fate

Clouded Communications

The Lost Cause

Appearances Can Be Deceiving

 

PART TWO:  THE BATTLE OF GETTYSBURG

 

A Word About General Meade

Day One:  July 1, 1863:  A Yod and Three T-Squares (Lee's Trap)

Communications Quagmire

Day Two:  July 2, 1863:  Intercepted Sun T-Square (Lee's Reprieve)

Chamberlain's Charge

Day Three:  July 3, 1863:  Air Grand Trine (Lee's Last Chance)

3:45 a.m.:  Meade Takes the Lead

1:07 p.m.:  The Grand Cannonade

3:10 p.m.:  Pickett's Charge

The Great Irony

 

                                                          

Introduction

 

The Civil War is the greatest tragedy ever to befall the United States of America.  It eradicated one way of life and changed the other forever.  More than three million Americans fought, and more than 600,000 died, in the four-year war that divided America and turned father against son,  and brother against brother.  One wonders if we will always be haunted by that terrible conflagration, as there are more than 18,000 books on the subject in the New York Public Library alone (and more being written every year).  Every year the Battle of Gettysburg is faithfully re-enacted by modern-day participants paying tribute to the great Battle that sealed the fate of the Confederacy.  From July 1, 1863 to July 3, 1863 occurred the largest and bloodiest battle of the American Civil War and the biggest battle ever fought on the North American Continent.  There were more than 50,000 casualties -- General Robert E. Lee lost one-third of his army; and one-quarter of the Army of the Potomac was killed or captured.  Never again did Lee attempt to invade the North and, in the long run, the Confederacy never recovered.

 

The Battle of Gettysburg is one of the most studied and written about in military history.  It is well-documented, even down to the time shots were fired to commence battle.  The stars influence, they do not compel is the astrologer's creed, but in this case, as we shall see, the stars seemed to compel the defeat of Robert E. Lee and the Confederacy.  An examination of the horoscopes for each of the three days of battle seems to justify Shelby Foote's assertion that the stars were against General Lee, however, before a discussion of the astrology of the Battle of Gettysburg begins, it is necessary to study the horoscope of Robert E. Lee.

 

PART ONE:  ROBERT E. LEE

 

Robert E. Lee:  Man of Destiny

 

Robert Edward Lee ("REL") was like American royalty.  His ancestors, Richard Henry Lee, Arthur Lee and William Lee, were notable figures in the American Revolution. On June 7, 1776, Richard Henry Lee introduced the original resolution for independence to the Continental Congress.  Richard and William both signed the Declaration of Independence; and Henry was one of the original Peace Commissioners sent to negotiate the Treaty of Paris after the Revolutionary War ended.  REL's father, Major General Henry ("Light Horse Harry") Lee fought in the American Revolution and went on to become Governor of Virginia before he fell on hard times.  REL never really knew his father, who died when REL was eleven.  Lee left home at seventeen to begin his life in military service (he had Mars in Virgo).  On April 1, 1824, REL accepted an appointment as a Cadet at The U.S. Military Academy (West Point) where he would graduate with the highest honors, eventually becoming a Superintendant. 

 

Lee was a great admirer of George Washington, the Father of our Country. He married one of Washington's relatives, his childhood playmate, Mary Custis (whose father was the grandson of George Washington).  He came to the attention of "Hancock the Superb," General Winfield Scott Hancock, for his excellent performance during the Mexican American War and had served the USA for 36 of his 54 years when he resigned from the United States Army on April 20, 1861.  It would seem unthinkable that a man of this distinction would violate his solemn West Point Academy oath and betray his country, but Robert Edward Lee was a Man of Destiny who was trapped by fate.

 

Rectification Exercises

 

The exact birth time of Robert E. Lee is not certain, therefore, rectification exercises were required to proceed with the utmost caution in analyzing the horoscope of this important historical figure.  The position of Venus was given particular attention because one of Lee's chief attributes in life was his appearance.  Often compared to the Hollywood actor, Randolph Scott, Lee was incredibly good-looking and his appearance had a mesmerizing effect on both men and women.  Besides having movie-star good looks, the charming REL loved parties and loved to flirt, so Venus had to have been an important planet in his horoscope.  The following dates were selected for rectification purposes:  (1) Lee's wedding date - June 30, 1831; (2) the date of Lee's resignation after 36 years in the United States Army - April 20, 1861; (3) the date Lee was commissioned Brigadier General in the Confederate Army - May 14, 1861; and (4) the date of the surrender at Appomattox - April 9, 1865.  Using the animation feature on my astrology software, I set the clock to run for the 24 hours of January 19, 1807 to see the movements in the heavens for the entire day of Lee's birth, and determined (primarily based on the movements of Venus that day) that it is most likely that Lee was born in the evening, after 5:00 p.m.  Space considerations do not permit an analysis of all the details of why an evening birth is the most likely (this would require a whole article by itself), but the time given by Lois Rodden in AstroDataBank 4 of 11:45 p.m. seems to fit Lee best.  Supposedly, this information was provided by Lee to an astrologer from his time.  This makes sense, for Lee surely would have been looking for answers as to why his cause failed, and with the Spiritualist movement on the rise, combined with his connections at Washington College, Lee would have had access to respected practitioners of the art of astrology and likely would have sought their counsel. 

 

The Venus Front

 

At 11:45 p.m. on January 19, 1807 at Stratford, Virginia, the Zodiac sign, Libra, was rising.  This symbolizes Lee's good-looking appearance, as Libra is the ruler of Venus.  Venus surely was a key influence in Lee's journey through life because of the charm and beauty she bestowed on him, but she was a front for the true master of the horoscope, Saturn in Scorpio in the first house (to be discussed in due course). 

 

The sign, Libra, represented by the scales of justice, likes to weigh, measure and consider all options, often leading to the inability to make a decision due to seeing, and sympathizing with, both sides in a dispute.  Indeed, REL worked for both sides in the great conflagration, and served the North far longer than he served the South.  REL is sometimes incorrectly called an abolitionist because of his open condemnation of slavery as a moral evil, but he owned slaves and even rented them out when he did not have positions for them, rather than set them free (Blount, pp. 39, 62).  Moreover, he gave contradictory opinions on the issue of slavery in his personal correspondence.  Libran ambiguity was a key theme in REL's life. 

 

Besides being the sign of balance, Libra is also the sign of relationships.  The ambiguities that pervaded the life of REL can be seen in all of his relationships, from his relationships with both parents to the relationship with his spouse to the relationships with his officers in battle.  He loved his father, Light Horse Harry, but was ashamed of him; he adored his frail mother, but couldn't wait to leave home as soon as he turned 17; and he never lost an opportunity to separate himself from his wife (his was a political marriage).   He often clashed with his supporting officers and this is particularly true in the Battle of Gettysburg.  This is all reminiscent of the capricious nature of the planet Venus, Libra's Ruler.  Another example of REL's Libran nature was his frequent indecision - it is well-known that REL did not like to give orders, and even when he did, they were often ambiguous.  This suited the Confederate officers and soldiers serving REL, who did not like to be told what to do! 

 

In square formation to the Libra Ascendant was an out-of-sign Stellium on REL's Nadir:  At 11:45 p.m. on January 19, 1807 at Stratford, Virginia, Jupiter at 22-degrees was on the Nadir in Capricorn, followed by Chiron at 28-degrees Capricorn; the Sun at 29-degrees Capricorn; and Venus very close by at four-degrees Aquarius.  This suits Lee to a tee.  Libra's planetary ruler, Venus, was in out-of-sign conjunction with the Sun and Chiron in the fourth house of home, family, land, the mother, early childhood and end-of-life issues.  He was obsessed with his home and family (Cancer MC, 4th house Stellium); and with his honor (Jupiter), all of which were threatened continuously throughout his life whether from debt, dishonor or the War.  His family home, Arlington Heights was taken from him and turned into a military cemetery, providing a last resting place for all the brave men who gave their lives for their country.  His honor, steeped in the "Lost Cause" tradition, was forever compromised because he broke his solemn West Point Academy oath to his country.  His life was full of suffering.  He was surrounded by it.  Chiron is only one degree away from the Sun, which infuses Lee's character with a martyr mystique.    The proximity of the two classic benefics (one on either side of the Stellium) provides some relief from Chiron's effects, but even Venus and Jupiter could not always shield Lee because he was trapped by his fateful Moon Yod.  Venus and Jupiter also symbolize the hero-worship surrounding Lee, as well as the "free pass" he has been accused of receiving for his role in America's greatest tragedy, but it should not be forgotten that the unenviable role he played cost him everything, his home, certain family members, his money, his citizenship and his honor.  He earned his coveted place in history, but it was at a terrible price.  Neither Jupiter nor Venus could save him from his fate.

 

In keeping with Venus's importance in his horoscope, Lee was not only charismatic, he was also a  clever man.  With his Capricorn Jupiter and Sun, REL was a superb administrator.  This was manifested in his perfect record at West Point Academy and eventual appointment there as Superintendent.  His exemplary performance in the Mexican-American War led to numerous field promotions and a commendation from General Winfield Scott Hancock; and the eventual offer of a colonelcy in the Federal Army.  In a 180-degree turn from his lifelong plans and ambitions, symbolic of the Stellium's opposition to his empty Midheaven,  he would reject the Federal offer to accept an appointment as Brigadier General in the Confederate Army, even before his resignation was accepted by the Army he had served for 34 of his 56 years.  This is shocking, but there was constant pressure on Lee from his Yod.

 

The Finger of Fate

 

Robert E. Lee was a Man of Destiny with the Finger of Fate pointing at him.  The Yod, or Finger of Fate (also called the Eye of God) is a difficult triple aspect in the form of an Isosceles triangle consisting of two planets sextile each other and both quincunx a third, fulcrum planet.  This is a harsh aspect.  Yod Bearers are driven people.  The Yod is like a cosmic prod that puts constant pressure on the individual to achieve and excel.  There is a feeling that something special is required of the individual, that he or she is different from others and more is expected of him/her.  Yods are very painful.  They can also be contagious in that they are so intense, they affect the people close to the Yod Bearer.  This is called the Collateral Yod Effect and a prime example of a Collateral Yod Bearer is Queen Elizabeth II (who is surrounded by Yod Bearers).  One wonders how many of Lee's officers suffered from the Collateral Yod Effect (Stonewall Jackson would seem an obvious example).

 

 

In REL's horoscope, every planet has a relationship with the Yod through sign rulership or aspect.  The Yod usually takes over the horoscope and such is the case here, even though Venus (as Ruler of the Ascendant) would appear to be the dominant planet.  Lee had a Gemini Moon Yod (which ruled his Midheaven) to Saturn in Scorpio and Mercury in Capricorn, which indicates that he was CHOSEN TO NURTURE.  He fulfilled his special purpose and nurtured the Union army for most of his life, then the Confederate army for the last four years of his military career, the influence of Gemini, the sign of two faces, at work.  He also nurtured "The Lost Cause," which would become his legacy.  Like all Yod Bearers, he was driven by his Yod, and it would affect every aspect of his life, but communications in particular were a source of constant turmoil for Lee.

 

Clouded Communications

 

Venus, the ruler of both the Ascendant and the eighth house of death, was trine REL's Moon Yod Fulcrum at six-degrees Gemini (Mercury's sign) in the eighth house to Saturn in Scorpio at nine-degrees in the first house sextile Mercury at seven-degrees Capricorn in the third house (Mercury's house).  Mercury rules communications of all kinds.  Clouded by Neptune applying to the Yod Activation Point (i.e., the midpoint between the sextile that forms the base of the triangle), communications were a lifelong source of vexation for Lee.  The Moon Yod Fulcrum in Mercury-ruled Gemini opposite Neptune was Lee's only planetary opposition and it occurs in the second house of money and resources:  Securing resources would also be a constant source of trouble for REL, both in his personal life and in his career.  He never recovered from his father's financial ruin and struggled for years to administer his father-in-law's complex Estate.  As leader of the Confederate Army, he had constant challenges supplying his Army due to the South's limited resources, for example, his Army had not eaten for three days when the surrender at Appomattox occurred.  REL would end the war in complete financial ruin without a cent to his name.  Not only did Neptune seemingly wreak havoc with Lee's finances and communications, it also clouded his philosophy.  Neptune is in Sagittarius, sign of the idealist, and Lee believed his ideals were righteous.  Lee's misplaced ideals defined him:  They are his legacy. 

 

The "Lost Cause"

 

Neptune in Sagittarius applying to REL's Yod Activation Point symbolizes "The Lost Cause," a phrase that has been used to refer to the struggle for southern independence.   It drove him during the second half of his life, in direct opposition to the path he followed in the first half of his life.  It was as though REL lived two different lives in the same incarnation.  This is typical of Yod Bearers and was discovered by author and astrologer, Karen Hamaker-Zondag, in her insightful work, The Yod Book.  According to Hamaker-Zondag, there is a duality in the lives of Yod Bearers, who often seem to have two different lives in the same incarnation, a "before" and "after."  In the "before" part of his life, REL was a champion of the Federal establishment, hero of the Mexican American War and Superintendent of West Point Academy; in the "after" part of his life, he did an about-face, leading the rebellion against his former country and colleagues.  Why did he do it?  Was he so determined to secure his place in history (like his hero, George Washington), that he would risk everything?  The answer lies in the first house.

 

Appearances Can Be Deceiving

 

Robert E. Lee's Ascendant, the indicator of how others see you, may have been in Venus-ruled Libra, but appearances can be deceiving.  Also resident in the first house in Scorpio are two heavyweights, eccentric Uranus and somber Saturn.  Arguably surpassing the planet Venus in importance was the planet Saturn, Father Time and the Lord of Karma and Fate.  REL was haunted by his father's fate and driven to rehabilitate his memory by securing his own place in history.  Perhaps in his mind, he was following in the footsteps of his idol, George Washington, by rebelling against a perceived powerful oppressor.  With the planet of rebellion, Uranus, only nine degrees away from the planet of fate, Saturn, it would seem that part of REL's Yod special purpose was rebelling (Uranus) against authority (Saturn), which would occur in the later part of his life (Yod-leg Saturn).  Uranus has five squares, so the need to rebel, once acknowledged, would be overwhelming.

 

On the surface, Venus would appear to be the boss, but beneath the surface, powerfully placed Saturn in Scorpio is the master of this horoscope.  People with Saturn in Scorpio tend to easily dominate all others around them with their passion and forceful determination.  REL's Saturn was heavily aspected, beginning with its Yod-base sextile to Mercury; a nearly exact quintile to Jupiter; two squares to Venus and the Sun; a trine to Pluto; and ending with the Yod Leg quincunx to the Moon.  Such a busy Saturn in a domineering sign in the first house of ego, combined with a boxed-in Uranus in its exaltation, would indicate a driven person who would break all the rules and to whom it would be impossible to say no.  Indeed, no one could resist the need for REL's approval and the spell of his magnetic personality.  With his patrician background, regal appearance, extensive military service and expertise and his iron determination, he was the ideal man to lead the Army of Northern Virginia against the Union.

 

PART TWO:  THE BATTLE OF GETTYSBURG

 

 

A Word About General Meade

 

General Meade was the battlefield counterpart to General Lee, therefore, his horoscope must be mentioned.  General George Gordon Meade was born of American parents on December 31, 1815 in Cadiz, Spain.  He graduated from the U.S. Military Academy (West Point) in 1835, ranking 19 out of 56.  He had been on the job less than a week when the Battle of Gettysburg occurred.  Once again, "the stars in their courses were against him" when Lee was suddenly faced with a new and unknown opponent without intelligence reports from Stuart.  Meade's horoscope is antithetical to Lee's on five different levels.  First, Meade's Sun, Moon and Mercury were in Capricorn, checkmating REL's Capricorn Sun, Mercury, Jupiter and Chiron.  Second, Meade's Jupiter at five-degrees Scorpio applied to REL's Saturn at nine-degrees Scorpio, giving Meade favor of fortune over Lee (he would overtake Lee in the BOG).  Third, Meade's Saturn at ten-degrees Aquarius overshadowed REL's Venus at four-degrees Aquarius -- Meade was late to the game, but Lee was overconfident.  Fourth, Meade's Aries Mars fell in REL's seventh house of open enemies, and Meade proved to be a formidable adversary.  REL's Mars in Virgo was weak in the first place, and having an opponent with Mars in its own sign, the sign of war, Aries, was not a fortunate occurrence for him.  Finally, General Meade's North Node was in Gemini, the sign of REL's Moon Yod, so it would seem that fate would favor Meade.

 

Day One:  July 1, 1863:  A Yod and Three T-Squares (Lee's Trap)

 

General Robert E. Lee had perpetual problems supplying his army with all manners of goods, which inadvertently led to the  Battle of Gettysburg (the "BOG").  The great Battle was accidental, a "meeting engagement" that occurred because the Confederates, many of whom were barefoot, had heard about a cache of shoes in the Pennsylvania town of Gettysburg.  At dawn on July 1, 1863, Confederate troops headed towards Gettysburg to find the shoes and ran headlong into General John Buford's Union cavalry.  An intense battle was underway by 8:00 a.m., with the Confederate army pouring in from the north and the Union army from the south.  Buford was outnumbered and immediately sent for reinforcements.  He was only able to hold off the Confederates because he had repeating rifles (something very new at the time).

 

At 7:30 a.m. on July 1, 1863 at Gettysburg, Pennsylvania, the Moon was waning from Full by three degrees in Cancer/Capricorn.  There were also three T-Squares and a rising Mars Yod in Leo to Chiron in Pisces in the eighth house and the Moon in Capricorn in the fifth house.  The Yod symbolized the violence and suffering to come on this day and it was in the Royal sign, Leo, representing the regal REL.  The BOG Mars Yod Fulcrum falls in REL's 10th house with its Pisces Chiron Leg exactly conjunct REL's Pluto in the fifth house; and the other BOG Capricorn Moon Leg falling at twelve-degrees Capricorn between Mercury and Jupiter in REL's third house of communications.  The BOG Moon Yod Leg was only five degrees from REL's Capricorn Mercury Yod Leg and would symbolize Lee's communication problems on this day, as though the fateful Transiting Leo Mars Yod was standing in his path to victory.  Indeed, he was ahead at the end of the first day, but his ambiguous orders to General Ewell resulted in a failure to consummate a potential victory.

 

Communications Quagmire

 

In keeping with the endless communication problems during the BOG, General Lee was late.  According to both Burns and Foote, Lee arrived in the middle of the afternoon on Day One of the Battle, most likely at approximately 2:10 p.m. when Transiting Leo Mars was exactly conjunct the BOG MC.  According to Shelby Foote, Lee had a sense of foreboding on that fateful day, not the least reason for which must have been the absence of his chief cavalry officer, Major Jeb Stuart, his "eyes and ears."  Stuart's scouts provided Lee with intelligence reports, and their absence was a serious handicap.  REL had not heard from Stuart in eight long days, and was forced to endure the handicap of arriving late at a major battle with no intelligence.  Furthermore, Lee did not wish to engage in battle without "Old Peter," the magnificent General James Longstreet, who was also late.  The biggest battle of the war was raging without REL's most important Generals.  Slowly, the outnumbered Union troops were reinforced by Major General John Reynolds and the famous Wisconsin Iron Brigade.  When General Reynolds was killed in battle, he was replaced by General Abner Doubleday, the man who invented baseball.  The slow arrival of Union reinforcements gave Lee the advantage, but he gave ambiguous orders to General Ewell to continue the attack "if practicable."  Unfortunately for the Lee and the Confederacy, Ewell decided it was not practicable to press for victory that day because he felt his men needed to rest.

 

The developmental quagmire of communications and logistics problems at the heart of this great Battle was symbolized by the three T-Squares at work on July 1, 1863 at Gettysburg, Pennsylvania.  The just-waning Full Moon was in T-Square formation with both Libra Jupiter and Aries Neptune, and a third Sun T-Square with Saturn opposing Neptune (out-of-sign) would be present throughout the three-day Battle.  On July 1, 1863, the Transiting Sun was at nine-degrees Cancer (the sign on REL's MC), and was opposite REL's Natal Mercury.  It was also applying to opposition with REL's Sun-Jupiter-Chiron Stellium.  The three T-Squares and the Yod fenced Lee in on Day One of the BOG.  He was trapped by fate -- Shelby Foote's poetic pronouncement that "...in time men would say of Lee . . . that the stars in their courses had fought against him" is haunting in its beauty and accuracy.  At the end of Day One of the BOG, it could be said that General Robert E. Lee lost his chance for victory, but from a celestial standpoint, he never had a chance with the crippling Mars Yod and three strangling T-Squares surrounding him.

 

Day Two:  July 2, 1863:  Intercepted Sun T-Square (Lee's Reprieve)

 

On Day Two of the Battle, the pressure from the Yod was off and Lee seemed to get a reprieve with the intercepted Sun, but in place of the two Full Moon T-Squares on July 1, there was a Taurus Pluto T-Square to Leo Mars opposing the Moon in Aquarius, which afflicted REL's Natal Venus in Aquarius.  General Lee was uncharacteristically stubborn and argumentative throughout the entire Battle, and he would lose his temper on Day Two.  All night long, both sides had been moving into position for Day Two of the Battle, with the Union line in the form of a giant fishhook curving around Culp's Hill and Cemetery Hill to the north; Little and Big Round Tops to the south; and Cemetery Ridge in the center (Pluto rules cemeteries).  The BOG Pluto T-Square occurred in REL's seventh house of partnership and symbolized the head-butting between Generals on both sides, but especially between Lee, Stuart and Longstreet.  With the Transiting Moon opposing Transiting Mars (and the Transiting Moon also conjunct REL's Natal Venus); and Transiting Saturn (which was separating from conjunction with REL's Natal Mars) opposing Transiting Neptune, Lee's two most important Generals, Stuart and Longstreet (Saturn/Mars), were incommunicado (Neptune) and would arrive late (Saturn) to the Battle (Mars).  Then, Lee would argue with both of them!

 

The Sun-Saturn-Neptune T-Square was still in effect and would cause further delays.  Longstreet finally arrived ahead of his men.  Then, it took him most of the day to line up his two divisions once they arrived because he did not want his men to be observed by the Federals and moved them under cover (Neptune), causing further delay (Saturn).  Lee was now outnumbered 85,000 - 65,000, as Stuart, Pickett and their men were still missing.  Lee and Longstreet argued about where to attack, and continued to disagree throughout the Battle (Moon opposing Mars in T-Square to Pluto).

 

Stuart finally arrived during battle preparations, tired and dirty, but proud of the supply train he had captured in the eight days he was missing.  Neither his men nor the supply train had arrived and General Lee was livid.  REL rarely reprimanded any of his officers, but on this day, he did not conceal his anger towards Stuart (Moon opposing Mars in T-Square to Pluto).  Stuart was devastated and it may have affected his performance, as he would be driven off the battlefield the following day by General George Armstrong Custer's much smaller group of cavalry.

 

The Transiting Cancer Sun was intercepted on Day Two of the BOG, and Lee seemingly got a big break when bumbling Union General Daniel Sickles (in violation of his orders) moved his troops a half-mile ahead of the Union line to the Peach Orchard, leaving the Round Tops (and the Union's flank), wide open.  General Meade was furious (Mars) and ordered Sickles to return to his post, but it was too late (Saturn) -- Longstreet opened fire (Mars) at 4:00 p.m. and Hood attacked the Round Tops.  Meade sent the Union's chief engineer, General Gouverneur K. Warren, Lieutenant Washington Roebling (who would go on to build the Brooklyn Bridge) and Colonel Joshua Lawrence Chamberlain's 20th Maine, to close the gap.   Under the killer Pluto T-Square, it rained molten lead on the battlefield.  In just over an hour, over 40,000 rounds were fired on Little Round Top alone and it was here that perhaps the bravest single act of the Battle of Gettysburg occurred.

 

 

Chamberlain's Charge

 

Many brave and fine men fought in the Battle of Gettysburg, and some of their names have been mentioned, but standing in REL's way, there was one man whose valor bordered on the divine, Colonel Joshua Lawrence Chamberlain ("JLC"), of the 20th Maine.  Like those of General Meade, JLC's planets would checkmate those of General Lee; and like Robert E. Lee, Chamberlain had the Finger of Fate pointed at him.  JLC had a Pluto Aries Yod to the Moon in Virgo and Jupiter in Scorpio.  Chamberlain's Jupiter Yod Leg at ten degrees Scorpio was one degree from Lee's Scorpio Saturn Yod Leg, giving him fortune's favor over Lee.  Chamberlain's Pluto Yod Fulcrum at six degrees Aries was conjunct the BOG Aries Neptune T-Square base -- he could cut through the communications fog of the BOG Sun T-Square to Neptune opposing Saturn and turn the tide of the Battle that would turn the tide of the War.

 

Joshua Lawrence Chamberlain was born on September 8, 1828 in Brewer, Maine.  It is regrettable that his fascinating horoscope cannot be given full analysis here with its Yod, Grand Trine and two T-Squares.  (These are also the signature aspects of America's New Horoscope, based on the three Paris Treaty charts of 1783/84.)  Chamberlain was wounded six times in the War and fought at Antietam, Fredericksburg, and Petersburg, but it is for his defense of Little Round Top at Gettysburg that he is most famous.  From 4:00 p.m. to dusk, raged the furious fight for control of Little Round Top.  As dusk approached, Chamberlain was nearly out of ammunition and had two choices:  retreat or charge.  He chose the latter and had his men fix bayonets.  The sound alone of several hundred steel bayonets clicking into place at the same time would have been spine-chilling.  With a rear guard in place to hold the hill, Chamberlain and his men charged down Little Round Top, bayonets glistening in the sunset.  The Confederates (who outnumbered the Federals ten to one), were so unnerved by the sight and sound of Chamberlain's Charge that they fled for their lives.  In all, Chamberlain lost 130 of his 386 men.  Not only were he and his men fighting Lee's Army on the Battlefield, Chamberlain's horoscope was also working against REL on a personal level:  JLC's Virgo Sun, Moon and Mercury were checkmating REL's Virgo Mars; his Scorpio Jupiter was checkmating REL's Saturn/Uranus; and JLC's Capricorn Mars, Neptune and Uranus were checkmating REL's Sun, Mercury, Jupiter and Chiron.  Finally, JLC's Saturn conjunct Venus in the first five degrees of Leo sits right on the BOG Day One Mars Yod Fulcrum.  JLC was a man of destiny CHOSEN TO ANNHILATE, TRANSFORM, RESURRECT.  Joshua Lawrence  Chamberlain was a key figure in the celestial conspiracy against Robert E. Lee during the three days of the Battle of Gettysburg.

 

Day Three:  July 3, 1863:  Air Grand Trine (Lee's Last Chance)

 

3:45 a.m.:  Meade Takes the Lead

 

Day Two of the Battle ended in a draw.  Day Three was Lee's last chance for victory because he was running out of ammunition and fresh troops, but the stars were still against him and nothing he tried worked.  Lee withdrew for the night on Day Two of the Battle without a war council and without giving orders to either Longstreet or Pickett (although he ordered General Ewell to attack at daybreak).  General Meade, on the other hand, called all seven of his corps commanders to consult with them on how to proceed:  They voted to stay and fight.  Lee rose at 3:00 a.m. to prepare for battle, but Meade took the lead and, at 3:45 a.m., opened fire on Culp's Hill where the Rebels had achieved a lodgment in the lower trenches.  On Day Three of the Battle, July 3, 1863, at 3:45 a.m., the third sign of the Zodiac, Gemini, was rising in a Grand Trine from Mercury conjunct Uranus in Gemini to Jupiter in Libra to the Moon in Aquarius.  The BOG Moon South Node at 3:45 a.m. was at six-degrees Gemini in the twelfth house of secret enemies --  Lee was his own worst enemy in the Battle -- he couldn't escape fate with his Natal Moon Yod Fulcrum at six-degrees Gemini conjunct the BOG South Node.  The BOG North Node at six-degrees Sagittarius was between REL's Natal Neptune and his Yod AP, so he would easily fool himself into thinking his troops were invincible.  The BOG South Node sitting on his Yod was aggravated by the BOG Mercury/Uranus conjunction, which constantly disrupted communications.  The Sun/Saturn/Neptune T-Square was still in effect as well, which occurred from the Transiting Sun in REL's ninth house of foreign lands square Transiting Saturn in REL's twelfth house of secret enemies; and square Transiting Neptune in REL's sixth house of work.  Nothing would go right for Lee on Day Three of the BOG.

 

1:07 p.m.:  The Grand Cannonade

 

In keeping with the emphasis on the number three, there were three separate attacks on Day Three of the Battle.  The first occurred at 3:45 a.m.; and the second occurred at 1:07 with the Grand Cannonade, the greatest artillery attack to occur in the War.  Libra was rising at 22-degrees, only one-degree from General Lee's Ascendant, with the Jupiter leg of the BOG Grand Trine in REL's twelfth house.  This was Lee's last chance to turn the Battle around.  In a Grand Cannonade at 1:07 p.m., the biggest in North American military history, Longstreet opened fire with a two-mile line of 140 cannons of different calibers.  His strategy was to clear the way for Pickett's Charge, but his cannons aimed too high and did far less damage than expected.  After about an hour, the Union guns fell silent to conserve ammunition and to try to deceive the Confederates that they had been routed by the Cannonade.  It worked, and Longstreet, believing the field to be cleared, reluctantly gave the order for Pickett to charge.  In keeping with the deception, miscommunication and chaos of the Sun T-Square and Mercury conjunct Uranus in Gemini, Longstreet and Lee bitterly disagreed on the strategy for Pickett's charge.  Longstreet wanted to circle around the Union line and attack from the rear, but Lee wanted Longstreet to charge the center of the Union line and sent Stuart (who would be routed by Custer) to attack the rear.  Pickett only had three brigades (approximately 15,000 men) and Longstreet was certain that that was not enough to break the Union line, but Lee refused to change his position.

 

 

3:10 p.m.:  Pickett's Charge

 

General George Edward Pickett was a favorite of General James Longstreet, even though he finished last in his class at West Point.  Pickett was eager to charge, and had been ready to do so since 6:00 p.m. the day before, but Lee considered Pickett's three Virginia brigades his shock troops and wanted to save them for his last throw.  Also, they were Lee's only fresh troops.  At just after 3:00 p.m., Pickett gave the order for his troops to charge across 1,700 yards of open field.  At 3:10 p.m., Transiting Venus was exactly conjunct the BOG Midheaven at 26-degrees Leo.  This is an unmistakable symbol of the foolishness and vanity behind such a suicide charge, as well as a symbol of General Pickett himself.  He was a handsome, vain man, known to wear perfume and dress his hair in curls.  In keeping with his vain nature, he foolishly stopped to dress the line midway during the charge!  Moreover, in keeping with the theme that the stars were against Lee at the BOG, there was a deadly star at work here, too.  Venus on the MC was square the dangerous fixed star, Caput Algol.  This is probably the most feared star in the heavens, and can be deadly, as was certainly the case here.  Pickett's men were doomed.  Those few who made it to the top of Cemetery Ridge were quickly repulsed by Union troops.  The Charge failed and Pickett's division was slaughtered; all of his commanders were wounded, as were sixteen of his seventeen field officers, eight colonels and three brigadier generals. Lee rode out to try to stop the retreating Virginians and ordered Pickett to regroup his division for a possible counterstrike.  Pickett indignantly informed Lee, "General Lee, I have no division now."  (Burns, p. 235.)  General Pickett never forgave General Lee for the terrible slaughter of that fateful charge.  Lee never again attempted to invade the North, and the momentum for a Confederate victory was lost, along with the Battle.

 

The Great Irony

 

The War would go on for two more bloody years.  Lee is blamed for this, but in the opinion of the renowned Civil War scholar, Professor James McPherson, the great irony of Lee's career is that his decision to keep fighting the North until all hope was exhausted led to the opposite of his intentions:  the complete destruction of the Southern economy and annihilation of the institution of slavery.  Robert E. Lee has been criticized for continuing the struggle after Gettysburg, even though he knew he did not have the manpower to ultimately prevail, however, if he had surrendered in 1863 instead of 1865, it is likely that there would have been further attempts to preserve the slave-dependant Southern economy and further insurrections like the one that began with the attack on Fort Sumter in 1861.  In 1865, the Southern economy had been completely destroyed and there was no hope of a Southern recovery in the form that existed before the Civil War.  This is the great irony of Lee's career.  It doesn't matter how many battles you win if you lose the war.  The Battle of Gettysburg was General Robert E. Lee's Waterloo, and Shelby Foote was right when he said of Lee and the Battle of Gettysburg on p. 461, Volume II, of his book, The Civil War:  "Fortuity itself, as the deadly game unfolded move by move, appeared to conform to a pattern of hard luck; so much so, indeed, that in time men would say of Lee, as Jael had said of Sisera after she drove the tent peg into his temple, that the stars in their courses had fought against him."

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Sources:

 

I.  Birth info:

Joshua Lawrence Chamberlain - Trulock, p. 26.

Robert E. Lee, Rodden AstroDatabank 4, Miers p. 14.

General George Meade, The General Meade Society of Philadelphia, http://www.civilwar.com/news/recent-postings/150484-the-general-meade-society-of-philadelphia.html

 

II.  Battle times:

Day One:  7:30 a.m. - Catton (329); Foote (468)

Day Two:  4:00 p.m. - Burns (218); Catton (337); Foote (501)

Day Three:  3:45 a.m. - Foote (527)

Day Three:  1:07 p.m. - Burns (227); Catton (342); Foote (541)

Day Three:  3:10 p.m. - Burns (228); Foote (548)

 

III.  Biographical/Historical:

Blount, Roy, Jr., Robert E. Lee, Penguin Books, New York, 2003.

 

Catton, Bruce, The Civil War, American Heritage Publishing Company, New York, 1982.

 

Foote, Shelby, The Civil War:  A Narrative, Volume 2:  Fredericksburg to Meridian, Random House, New York, 1963.

 

Miers, Earl Schenck, Robert E. Lee, Alfred A. Knopf, New York, 1956.

 

McPherson, James, Jr., Drawn With the Sword:  Reflections on the American Civil War, Oxford University Press, New York, 1996.

 

Morris, Richard B., The American Revolution, Lerner Publication Company, Minneapolis, 1985.

 

Nolan, Alan T., Lee Considered, The University of North Carolina Press, Chapel Hill, 1991.

 

Trulock, Alice Rains, In the Hands of Providence:  Joshua L. Chamberlain and the American Civil War, The University of North Carolina Press, Chapel Hill, 1992.

 

Ward, Geoffrey C. with Burns, Ken; Burns Ric, et al., The Civil War, Alfred A. Knopf, New York, 1990.

 

http://penelope.uchicago.edu/Thayer/E/Gazetteer/People/Robert_E_Lee/FREREL/1/1*.html (for Douglas Southall Freeman's definitive biography of Robert E. Lee).

http://www.visit-gettysburg.com/the-battle-of-gettysburg-timeline.html